Bashing Your Boss On Facebook Is Never Okay

Posted by Lady Mel On Tuesday, July 6, 2010 8 comments

Hello everyone! We have our first guest blogger! Give a round of applause to my good Twitter friend, Jessica Malnik. Jessica, take it away!
                                                                *********

Jessica Malnik is a Gen Y blogger and social media enthusiast. For Jessica's social media,
technology and workplace ramblings, please visit her blog here.

The other day I came across a startling statistic in a workplace ethics article conducted
by the Ethics Resource Center (ERC).

"Twelve percent of Millennials, for example, said they believe it is acceptable to post negative
comments about their employer on blogs or Twitter."

The fact that 12% of Gen Yers think it's okay to bash their boss on blogs and social
media sites is mind-boggling. The Internet is a very OPEN community. I don't care how
many privacy settings you have on your social media accounts. That information can still
be accessed by anyone either directly or indirectly through a mutual connection.

It's simple. Show some restraint on the Internet. I refer to it as the "Grandma
Standard." That is, if you can't say it to your grandma, then you probably shouldn't post
it on Facebook, Twitter, Myspace etc.

Then, apply the "Kindergarten rule." That is if you can't say something nice, then don't
say or write it at all. That goes for your friends, coworkers and definitely your boss.
Everything negative you write will definitely get back to that person eventually. There's
tons of examples of people losing their job due to inappropriate Facebook status, tweets,
blog posts etc. For instance, there is the girl who got fired from her job, after personally
attacking her boss on Facebook. Not smart.

After the "grandma standard" and the "kindergarten rule," exercise some commonsense.
It's probably a bad idea to call out sick and then tweet later that night about your late
night party.

If you exercise these three golden rules, you will avoid a lot of aggravations in the
future.

Most importantly, just be yourself online, but better. Take some proud and OWN and
MANAGE your online presence.

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8 comments:

Annah said...

Yet another way Facebook will try to get you! lol

redannahbanana<---- Me on Twitter. I'm still trying to get the hang of it.

And I'm STILL BEGGING YOU to subscribe to my blog. I'm not giving up!

Lady Mel said...

@ANNAH I already did. lmao. I'm have the girl with the orange thing on her head. You must return the favor. :)

Tricia said...

Well said, well said! It is really interesting what photos, comments and statuses (is this even a word?) people post on facebook. I have witnessed a lot of drama going on too. When I joined facebook 5 years ago I didn't think my mom was going to be on it! And I sure didn't think they were going to screw us with the lack of privacy promises etc. At least I never posted drunk photos...

Lady Mel said...

@Tricia I think Jessica nailed it. A lot of people on Facebook does not have the integrity and maturity to begin with in order to reframe from such a matter.

That behavior is what gets people fired and their careers in question. If you talk harshly about your boss and then he/she fires you, then who is going to give you that recommendation for your next job? No one lol.

Jessica said...

Thanks, Christina! It's so much easier to think before you post or tweet than it is to deal with the ramifications from posting rants against someone.

Lady Mel said...

@Jessica No problem! Yup. Think before you tweet or type.

Seygra20 said...

whilst, I agree with this, I would say it's okay to bash your boss or employers on social media network ONLY if you are prepared to deal with the consequences....be it positive or negative.....I bashed my ex-manger on facebook and I am fully prepared to deal with the consequences.

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